Film: Exchange – University of Copenhagen

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Department of Media, Cognition and Communication > Research > MCC projects and externally funded projects > Film: Exchange

Film: Exchange

Billede: Medier
The research group Film : Exchange encompasses film and media scholars from the Department of Media, Cognition and Communication’s Film and Media Studies Section, members of their scholarly networks, both nationally and internationally, and practitioners associated with such institutions as the National Film School of Denmark, The Danish Broadcasting Corporation, The Danish Film Institute, and The National Film Actors Academy of Denmark.


Film : Exchange provides a platform for developing and strengthening initiatives aimed at community engagement, knowledge transfer, knowledge exchange, and internationalization. The network’s projects span a wide range of topics related to moving images, including acting, human rights, screen writing, talent development, concept development, mood and emotion, health and wellbeing, environmental aesthetics, gender, ethnicity, and public values. The projects are designed

 - to forge links with the milieus of practice in the greater Copenhagen area and beyond;

 - through workshops and events, to introduce students and a wider public to ongoing film and media studies research with clear relevance to society and the cultural industries;

 - through collaborative efforts bridging theory and practice, to spearhead further research in the still emerging area of practitioner’s agency;

 - to capture the contextual specificities of film and media practices in small nations, in some instances on a comparative basis.

Projects associated with Film : Exchange

Engaging with the Art and Craft of Acting

PIs: Andreas Gregersen and Johannes Riis

A pilot study of how students of acting learn their profession.
By employing interviews and observation, the project hope to shed light on different mental approaches and techniques for developing a character or delivering a line. A key question guiding the study concerns the extent to which student actors try to direct their attention to real objects, for instance events in their past, in a projective effort, as opposed to objects of make-believe.

The project will also pay attention to the use of metaphors in preparing a role. We will examine how student actors assess different techniques, for instance whether certain techniques are favored in connection with certain tasks.
The study focuses on a small sample of student actors, who have completed at least half a year of training. The hope is that the subjects in question will be able to verbalize some of their choices and experiences as they are learning their craft.

Our study is inspired by a larger project currently being carried out at the University of Lethbridge, Canada. In order to refine both results and methods, we are collaborating with the group behind the Canadian study, which is cross-disciplinary (films studies, drama, neuropsychology) and involves Aaron Taylor, Douglas MacArthur, Peter Alward, Louise Barrett, and Javid Sadr.