Conference: Body Language in the Moving Image

10.00 Welcome: Lennard Højbjerg

10.10 Henry Bacon: Who is hiding what? - bodily figures of suppression in Haneke's Caché  conference

10.50 Coffee break

11.05 Camilla Dindler og Andreas Gregersen: Gaze under fire: constructing victimization in adversarial interviewing

11.45 (break)

11.50 Ole Ertløv: Embodiment – and video game theory. Critical considerations

12.30 Lunch

13.15 Mariah Larsson: Making Love Detumescently: Some Preliminary Notes on The Body Language of the Penis

13.55 (break)

14.00 Rikke Schubart: Cat Women and Werewolf Men: Gender, Body Language, and the Attractive Monstrous Performance

14.40 Coffe break

14.55 Casper Tybjerg:  Figures in Landscapes: Expressive Bodies in 1920s Scandinavian Film 

15.35 (break)

15.40 Lennard Højbjerg: The Basic Research Question: Body Language or Bodily Involvement in the Moving Image?  

16.20 (break)

16.25 – 17.10 Johannes Riis: Communication and Representational and Relational content in Gesture and Facial Expressions

 

Papers

Who is hiding what? - bodily figures of suppression in Haneke's Caché
Henry Bacon, professor, Helsinki University

I will be exploring, first of all, how we are cued on the basis of body language to assess how candid and honest Georges, Majid and Majid's son are in their mutual encounters. The second question is, what does Georges' behaviour and style of behaviour suggest about his willingness to really deal with the issues the videos and drawings he receives force him to confront. 

Gaze under fire: constructing victimization in adversarial interviewing

Camilla Dindler, adjunkt AAU, and Andreas Gregersen, lektor Københavns Universitet

Our presentation will outline some preliminary results from an analysis of a publicly controversial television interview on the news program “Deadline” at DR2 in March 2013.

The interview was interacted by journalist Martin Krasnik and historian and journalist Lars Hedegaard, radical Islam critic and co-founder of Trykkefrihedsselskabet (Free Press Society).

The aim of our analysis is to explore how the body language of the two actors is constituent in constructing an oppositional relationship of aggressor-victim in the interview, which perhaps itself enforces the dynamics of the interaction. The elements of language itself and the institutional context of journalism will of course also be taken into account.

Embodiment – and video game theory. Critical considerations
Ole Ertløv, lektor AAU. 

According to Torben Grodal (Grodal 2009) we experience the world and its artefacts due to a permanent flow of PECMA-circles. In some cases the PECMA flow is not entirely completed, for instance in the case of film viewing, we, in most cases, only simulate motor action. Video games, on the other hand, allow or demand certain motor action in order to be fully experienced. According to Gregersen and Grodal (Gregersen & Grodal 2009) the integration of the player in the artefact is based on an activation of aspects of embodiment. But what does that mean? Do we embody the playing situation by expansion of our being and acting in the world or do we project our embodiment onto the dynamics of the interactive simulated world?

This presentation presents my first and still very sparse literature review on this theoretical problem.

Making Love Detumescently: Some Preliminary Notes on The Body Language of the Penis
Mariah Larsson, docent

”The one interesting aspect is that the hero succeeds in doing something no other man has ever been able to do. He makes love detumescently. I say the hell with the movie; let's have his secret.” (Roger Ebert, review of I am Curious – Yellow, 1969)

Some might say that an erection is the most obvious and immediate body language there is and that abscense of erection is, too, in a way. However, the body language of the (erect or flaccid) penis is highly problematic and ambiguous, evoking issues of accepted and unaccepted images, symbolism, authenticity or inauthenticity (as in the quote above), and notions of desire, need, but also demand and even violence.  In addition, it is fraught with tensions and anxiety regarding sexual performance.

In this presentation, I will use a few examples from Swedish films to discuss some preliminary ideas about the images of the penis.

Cat Women and Werewolf Men: Gender, Body Language, and the Attractive Monstrous Performance
Rikke Schubart, lektor, University of Southern Denmark

Why are there so many cat women and male werewolves in the horror film and, reversely, so few cat men and werewolf women? What makes a monstrous performance convincing and/or appealing and what role does gender play here?

This presentation takes the werewolf transformation scene in popular horror film and television as its example and examines how our natural fears/fascinations interacts with cultural gender stereotypes in creating certain monstrous performances. It asks a) if our perception of animals is gendered, b) how such gendering affects the monstrous performance in the horror genre, c) and it finally suggests such gendering is historically situated and subject to change.

The presentation will examine two werewolf transformations, one with a man and one with a woman.

Figures in Landscapes: Expressive Bodies in 1920s Scandinavian Film
Casper Tybjerg, lektor, Københavns Universitet

In one of the Danish reviews of Victor Sjöström’s film Terje Vigen (1917), the reviewer remarked how Sjöström’s acting “triumphed” in the film’s “mighty” landscapes: “It was as if he grew with them.” In this paper, I shall look at some examples of how surroundings (natural and otherwise) and situations prompt bodily expressions of emotion in 1920s Scandinavian films.

The Basic Research Question: Body Language or Bodily Involvement in the Moving Image?
Lennard Højbjerg, lektor, Københavns Universitet

Dealing with Body Language in the moving image has shown a variety of approaches among which the contradiction between between body language as a real phenomenon represented in moving image and bodily involvement calls for analyses and answers. Therefore I will present a taxonomy of categories to describe how we deal with the topic. Hopefully it can provide us with a set of concepts which can be used to structuring the forthcoming work.

Communication and Representational and Relational Content in Gesture and Facial Expressions
Johannes Riis, lektor, Københavns Universitet 

Although both channels of nonverbal communication generally functions expressively, they arguable do so in different ways. Using mid-19th century actors and directors, I will try to adapt a distinction originally posed by Karl Buehler